1985: ALAIN PROST

Model produced by: Paul’s Model Art (Minichamps)

Year: 1985
Driver: Alain Prost (France)
Team: McLaren TAG
Car: McLaren MP4/2B
Results: 5 wins, 11 podiums, 2 poles, 5 fastest laps

The 1985 Formula One season saw continued success for the McLaren-TAG team. After missing out on the championship by just half a point the previous year, Alain Prost would ultimately secure his first of four titles by a 23-point margin. The Formula One writer Koen Vergeer remarks that “it was about time, everyone knew he was the best”, reflecting a general feeling that Prost had been unlucky to finish runner-up twice, to Nelson Piquet and Niki Lauda. McLaren also took the constructors’ title.

The reigning champion Lauda competed in his final season of Formula One but was unable to match Prost for results, winning just once despite being close to his team-mate in terms of pace. For most of the season the points table was headed by Ferrari’s Michele Alboreto, who enjoyed his best season in F1. He won the Canadian and German Grands Prix, and was on the podium eight times. Ferrari’s results faded badly in the second half of the season as other emerging drivers took the fight to Prost. Among these were Ayrton Senna and Nigel Mansell, both of whom scored their first victories in 1985.

1.5-litre turbo engines had become universal by 1985, heralding the extinction of the Ford Cosworth DFV. Between 1985 and 1986 Formula One engines would achieve the highest levels of power ever seen in the sport, before serious restrictions and their ‘phasing out’ began in 1987.

The 1985 season is widely considered by the F1 community to be one of the best and most exciting Formula One seasons of all time. In a season full of excitement, it was the first and last of many things. The 1985 season was affirmation of Senna as one of the best drivers in the world in only his 2nd season of Formula One, the first championship win of 4 for Prost and the first and second race wins of 31 for Mansell and first and second race wins of 41 for Senna.

(Source: Wikipedia)

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